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Controlling Your Portions Can Help With Dieting Success

Contributed by: NAPSA

(NAPSA) - No wonder it can be so hard to diet. Most people get in the habit of eating a certain amount of food to feel satisfied-and if they're served more food, they tend to eat more.

A good first step in controlling your weight is to measure the portions you already eat, so you understand how much you are consuming-and then either limit portion size or make healthier substitutions.

Controlling Your Portions Can Help With Dieting Success
If the full plate is important to you, try using a smaller plate. Or keep portion sizes the same, but cut calories by lowering the fat in your dishes and adding more low-calorie ingredients such as crunchy vegetables and leafy salads.

Here are some more tips to help.

  • Leave a quarter of what you're served on your plate. If dining out, you can place some of the food in a "to go" container right away.

  • Cut back wherever you can-use a little less butter on your bagel, a little less dressing on your salad. Ask for salad dressing on the side so you can add just what you need for flavor.

  • A good way to alter your eating behavior is to get used to eating smaller portions. One successful strategy is to serve food on smaller plates.

  • To ensure satisfying portions, add more fruits, vegetables and beans to your meals.

  • Use these visual cues when looking at portions. A deck of cards is about the size of 3 ounces of cooked meat. A baseball is the size of a medium-sized piece of fruit.

  • Don't let deprivation lead to a splurge. If you have a smaller entree portion, fill up the rest of your plate with vegetables and green salad, rather than topping off your meal with chocolate cake.

  • Measure foods at home so when you eat out you'll know how much pasta or rice you may be eating. A half cup of rice or pasta is a typical serving size but restaurant portions are often larger.

  • Read food labels to get familiar with calories, fat contents and nutrients you're getting with each serving.

  • "Value meals" may be good for the wallet but bad for the waist. You may be better off choosing individual items in smaller portion sizes.

  • Get help if you need it. alli, the only FDA-approved, over-the-counter weight-loss aid, can help boost your diet efforts by preventing about 1/4 of the fat you eat from turning into calories.

For a tryout of the myalliplan behavioral support program, which includes personalized lessons created by weight-loss experts and tools and resources for planning and creating meals, tracking calories and fat, becoming more active and charting pounds lost, visit www.myalli.com.


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